Hiatal Hernia

What is a hiatal hernia?

A hiatal hernia is an upward bulge of the stomach through the diaphragm muscle, the horizontal muscle that separates the chest from the stomach. Normally, the esophagus (the swallowing tube) passes through a hole (the hiatus) in the diaphragm to reach the stomach. In a hiatal hernia, the stomach bulges up into the chest through that opening. A hiatal hernia is an extremely common condition that usually does not cause symptoms or problems.

What causes a hiatal hernia?

Most of the time, the cause is not known. Some studies suggest that increased pressure in the stomach from coughing, straining during bowel movements, pregnancy and delivery, or substantial weight gain may contribute to the development of a hiatal hernia. Others are born with a weakness or an especially large hiatus.

What are the symptoms of a hiatal hernia?

How are hiatal hernias treated?

Most people do not have any symptoms with their hiatal hernia, so no treatment is necessary. If there is constant heartburn, difficulty in swallowing or other symptoms general guidelines to reduce the secretion of acid and reflux are:

Please feel free to call (315) 410-7400 with any questions or concerns

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